Uncle Bob's Travels

Places I've hung out in, sometimes briefly.

Dickenson County VA

dickenson

If possible, I always read these signs.  This one got me because I was intrigued that the writer described W.J. Dickenson (who otherwise remains shadowy on the net) as a “prominent public man”.  He actually served as a delegate to the Virginia General Assembly in terms from 1854 to 1882.  He sponsored the bill to establish Dickenson as Virginia’s 100th county and to name it (blush) in honor of himself.

Thing on 17th Street

bristol

This is on 17th Street in Bristol.  I don’t have any idea of what it represents.

Bristol VA, Two Hotels

hotelbristolfronthotelbristolback

This one is the older of the two, built, according to a Bud Phillips article in a 2105 issue of the Bristol Herald Courier, in 1910-12.  The card was printed in 1950.

hotelshelbyfront

hotelshelbyback

This card was also printed in 1950.  The article mentioned above states that this hotel was built in the 1920s.

Coincidentally, both hotels went away in the 70s.  Hotel Bristol, abandoned by then, burned down.  The Shelby was demolished.

A couple of notes: The sign “Hotel Bristol” has been enhanced by a retoucher, as has the sign for the Shelby.  All the windows have shades.  All are exactly at exactly the same level.  Retouching, again, I’m sure.

Sexco!

sexco

This is in Eastern Kentucky, west of Whitesburg.  There were several trucks there with this company name on them.  “Sexco” used to be a trademark of a telecommunications company, a provider of dial-up equipment, but the mark was abandoned in 2001.  Guess what the name is used for now.  Time’s up.  You got it.

Dixie Tannery/Columbian Paper Mill

Recently, my buddy and I were allowed to take pictures at the sites of Dixie Tannery and Columbian Paper Company in Bristol.  Dixie Tannery got its start around 1894 and Columbian Paper Company arose in the 1900-1901 time period.  Both were hot numbers, in their times.  Dixie Tannery went under in 1952; Columbian Paper Company, which had been sold first to Mead Paper Company, then moved over to the Wheelwright Company, went on for a few more years.

Before WWI, many of the better postcards were litho printed in Germany.  The Dixie Tannery card, which had a “Made in Germany” line on the back (it’s postally unused), still bothers me.  It looks too new to be over a century old, but, otherwise, looks authentic.

The Columbian Paper postcard reeks of authenticity.  It’s postmarked November, 1914. The card itself dates to around 1910.

dixietannery

columbian

Here’s part of Dixie Tannery today:
dixie.jpg

This is what’s left of Columbian Paper Company.  The stack is still complete, the structure to the left is a 1931 railroad access ramp at the end of a spur.  The gray unit in the background isn’t part of this complex.

columbian

Heading up to Uz?

Turn here:

uzsign

Interesting story, Uz.  Pronounced: “you-zee”.  Rennick says in Kentucky Place Names that the Louisville & Nashville railroad was having such a time acquiring the right of way from obstinate landowners that they decided to name the station Uz, after the Land of Uz, where Job endured such difficulties. Don’t look too hard for Uz, though.  It’s mostly not there anymore.  You can still see the foundations of the old freight station, if you look hard enough…

Snow on the Mountain (Who Shot Sam?)

Sorry for the title…that reference to an old George Jones song just crept in.


This is up near the top of Powell Mountain on the Orbie Cantrell Highway (U.S. 23) on November 19.  The overlook is just behind me.  That’s snow blowing in over the mountain.  It wasn’t a significant snowfall, just flurries, but it was the first I’d seen this season.

On the French Broad…River, of course.

frenchbroad

This is in Madison County NC.

On the Way to Raccoon KY

“If you’re traveling to the North Country Fair…”, or if you happen to be driving up to Raccoon KY, you might see this sign:

raccoon

 

Indian Mountain Trade Center

indmtnsign

This is just past Wise on the Orby Cantrell (US Rt. 23…keep going north and you wind up in Mackinaw City MI).
indmtn

On warm weekends, this place is hoppin’.  Take care in the parking lots, though, they’re totally free form.

It’s a fun place to visit if you like to watch people. There’s a bunch of them strolling slowly through the lines of vendors.  The things I’ve seen…doctor my eyes…

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