Uncle Bob's Travels

Places I've hung out in, sometimes briefly.

Cherokee Lake!

 

 

Well, will you look at that!  Two more overly-blue, lyin’ postcards from the early 60s.  They’re Haynes cards, of course.  Busy Joyce Haynes shot both pictures. However, someone fed her some erroneous information about the Veterans Overlook (top view).  It’s more like 1940′ or so in elevation, according to Google Earth (which, as I’ve mentioned before, is a fine program for viewing areas from above…it’s free and it features historic imagery – blurry imagery, generally)(if you like old topo maps, check out oldmapsonline.com).

The information on the bottom card is pretty accurate.  The lake varies in size and, of course, these cards were printed over a half century ago.

Washington College Academy

From the early 60s.  Carnegie Building at the Academy.  Credit line is “PIONEER PRINTERS, A Student Industry of Washington College Academy, Washington College, Tenn.”  However, the photographer was Joyce L. Haynes, who was part owner of Haynes Publishing Company out of Roanoke.

Hawkins County Memorial Hospital

This view of the hospital probably dates to the year after it opened; although, I can’t imagine any hospital having a completely empty parking lot, at any time.  The date in ink on the top of the card is when The Unknown Collector acquired the card.  TUC seems to have collected Haynes Publishing cards, for some reason.

The hospital certainly looks different today.

The Old Dante Rescue Squad Building

It was the Dante Rescue Squad building, then something else, and now it’s going away.
Support your local rescue squad.  They see stuff you don’t want to…

Shop Sign

Tri-City refers to Lynch, Benham and Cumberland KY.  This sign, part of which is missing, is on a doorway in the back of the abandoned high school in Lynch.

Paps Is On The Move

This was down near Rutledge TN in 2015.  Note the bell on the canopy of this gussied up golf cart.

Coal Building

This is in Middlesboro KY.  I thought the building was interesting, faced in coal and such.  I emailed a polite request for information on the building.  Never got an answer.  Incidentally, this was taken on a Saturday.  The Chamber of Commerce was closed, locked and latched.

Anyway, the structure was built in 1926 using 42 tons of bituminous coal (which is 2.6 tons more than the person in the 1946 Merle Travis hit “Sixteen Tons” loaded.  Incidentally, George S. Davis claimed to have written the song in the 1930s as “Nine-to-Ten Tons”.  Check it out here).  That title is more general, since “number 9 coal” apparently refers to a particular seam of coal in Kentucky (there are multiple other claims to origin).
I know that Tennessee Ernie Ford (“Old Ern” from Bristol TN/VA) recorded this in 1955, but his version is generally considered to be more jazz than country.
And, man, could Tennessee Ernie sing hymns.  Better than George Beverly Shea and without the strange pronunciation of words, like “lard” for “Lord”.

Mooresburg Post Office

The Mooresburg TN Post Office.  This trailer was parked in front of here.
Between Rogersville and Bean Station, Mooresburg has had a Post Office since 1814.

How Natural Tunnel Used to Look

nattunnelfront

This is how the area looked before it became a state park in the late 60s.
The railroad built the line through this tunnel is 1893.  Can you imagine what the area around this tunnel looked like in the latter days of the 19th century?
To its credit, the park service has done good job in making the tunnel accessible, but not dangerously so.

nattunnelback

The acquisition date across the bottom is misleading, I think.  I’d date this card to the early 50s.  The tunnel, btw, is not 1557′ long…it’s 850′.

Two Old Theatres

It’s rare to find one old, rusty movie theatre as we roll from town to town like some 21st century Virgil Q. Wacks.  But, to find two.  Score!
This one’s in Middlesboro KY.  It ran the big movies from 1948 to the early 80s, which is interesting, because this theatre
park
in Ewing VA, has a similar date span.   It’s almost completely gutted. Behind the board fence on the left, you can look down and see that it’s effectively a three-story building.
theater

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